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with a


Nymph

Like many words shared by science and fly fishing, the work nymph has two meanings: one technical, as used by entomologists, and another more general as used by anglers.  To entomologists, nymph refers to the immature stage of any insect with incomplete metamorphosis. That means those insects with three life stages: egg, nymph, and adult. Among aquatic insects, the orders Ephemeroptera (mayflies), Plecoptera (stoneflies), Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) and Hemiptera (water boatmen and back swimmers) are the principal groups.  The immature stage of insect orders with complete metamorphosis is technically called larva.  These insects undergo four life stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult.  The main orders of aquatic insects with complete metamorphosis are Trichoptera (caddisfles), Megaloptera (alderflies and hellgrammites).Coleoptera (beetles), and Diptera (true flies, including mosquitoes, blackflies, and midges).

Most fly fishers use the word nymph to refer to the immature underwater stage of any aquatic insect.  They also use the term to describe fly patterns that are fished underwater and imitate the nymphal or larval stages of aquatic insects.  Because the word has multiple meanings, it is easy to get confused.  Just remember that nymph and larva both refer to the immature stage of insects,and nymph patterns are designed to imitate them. [Nymph-Fishing Rivers and Streams, Rick Hafele,2006]


 Oh, thrilling the rise to the lure that is dry
When the shy fish comes up to his slaughter
Yet rather would I have
The turn to my fly.
With a cunning brown wink under water.
The bright little wink under water!
Mysterious wink under water!
Delightful to ply
The subaqueous fly.
And watch for the wink under water

....Edward MacKenzie Skues




Typical Nymph Proportions

This is the main box that will contain the information about the picture that is found in this box. This is an experimental program that is to see how the picture will look in the box. It is hoped that the picture will wrap around the picture as it is floated to the right.

 

 



Recommended Nymphing Techniques

Fish Location Water Conditions
Depth   Velocity
Hot Spot Type Techniques
Near the bottom 5-15 ft   Slow Pools in large to medium rivers Countdown method
Near the bottom 4-8 ft   Medium-fast Runs in large to medium rivers Shot and indicator
Brooks method
Near the bottom 1-4 ft   Medium-fast Runs, riffles, and tailouts Shot and indicator
hinged leader
Leisenring lift
Near the bottom 2-6 ft   Medium Pocket water in runs or riffles Shot and indicator
High Sticking
Near the bottom 1-4 ft   Slow-medium Flats in medium to large rivers
and pools in small streams
Shot and indicator
Sawyer method
Leisenring lift
Mid-depth,
2 - 3 feet deep
5-15 ft   Pools Pools Hinged Leader
Shot and indicator
Mid-depth,
- 3 feet deep
2-4 ft   Flats Flats Sawyer method
Shot and indicator
Hinged leader
Leisenring lift
Mid-depth,
2 - 3 feet deep
4-8 ft   Medium-fast Runs Shot and indicator
Hinged leader
Leisenring lift
Mid-depth,
2 - 3 feet deep
14 ft   Medium-fast Riffles and runs Shot and indicator
Hewitt method
Leisenring lift
Near surface,
in film to about
1 foot deep
5-10 ft   Slow Pools and flats Wet-fly swing
Leisingring lift
Skues method
Near surface,
in film to about
1 foot deep
2-6 ft   Medium Flats and runs Wet-fly swing
Skues method
eisenring lift
Hewitt method
Neaar surface,
in film to about
1 foot deep
1-4 ft   Fasr Runs and riffles Wet-fly swing
skues method
Leisenring lift
Hewitt method